It is currently Mon Sep 25, 2017 9:02 pm



Reply to topic  [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3
1999 VW Jetta GL MK3 GRM $2011 Challenge build 
Author Message
CVO Forums User
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:42 am
Posts: 50
She is alive!! Last night marked the first time in a year+ that the Jetta was off jackstands and moving down the street! It was the first chance to effectively test the various changes that were made in 2011 – shifter bushings, clutch, exhaust, electrical. All went well, although the suspension is a mess – that is next.
Since I just glossed over all the work that happened since the last update, let’s back up to share the details to bring everyone up to speed since the last update.
...reading through the last update to see where we were…
There was an update on the air compressor and the lines. The lines have been great, but the little Harbor Freight/Central Pneumatic air compressor was returned. It kept tripping the internal breaker when it was below 40 degrees, the pump couldn’t get itself going. Constantly resetting the breaker is a pain when the compressor is in the attic. Additional negative points came from the disappointment that the advertised CFM was overly optimistic and the excessive noisiness of the direct drive motor. I’m not going to say avoid Harbor Freight, just research what you are getting (I understand their larger (60-80 gallon) US General dual stage 5hp compressor is a good value). After the Central Pneumatic was returned and web research was completed, an order went out for a Quincy portable 2hp, belt driven (quieter), with a 20 gal horizontal tank. The Quincy brand is well respected, it is made in the US, it puts out greater CFM, and the design has the motor running at something like 800 rpm – about half the competitors and about a quarter of the noisy Central Pneumatic. The plan is to mount this in the attic where the old one was.
Image

The previous update on the car talked about starting the build of the exhaust. The header was rebuilt with a larger pipe with a 3-bolt flange bolted to a matching flange on the muffler. The muffler sits under the shifter in the widest section of the exhaust tunnel and at the last update ended at the muffler with its dual outlets. With the muffler in place the engine was prepped for a test fire (with the car still up on jack stands) for the first time since the spring. The purpose was to ensure that all systems were still operational, that the exhaust wouldn’t hit the body with the engine running, to check the alignment of the drive belts, refill the coolant with the water pump running, refill the trans after running it through the gears, make sure the clutch felt ok, and that nothing leaked. The test run went perfect although I was surprised at how little fluid both the cooling system and trans required. Either the fluids weren’t completely drained or they are not totally filled –both of these will be double (triple) checked before any serious driving.

When the clutch operation was checked it felt like there was a lot of slack in the clutch pedal. The clutch cable had been swapped between an automatic and manual clutch cable a few times and it was thought that the automatic cable was operating correctly. After testing the clutch operation on jack stands, the auto cable wasn’t taking out the slack in the clutch pedal that it should have, so the manually adjusted cable was swapped in again. A benefit of having a partially stripped interior is that the clutch cable is more accessible under the dashboard. You still have to lie on your head in the footwell to disconnect/reconnect to the clutch cable, but nothing needs to be removed under the dash.

There is no flex section in the header, so the risk of the exhaust hitting the body was unknown. Since the motor and trans mounts have all been significantly stiffened it was good to see that the engine didn’t budge when revved. It is possible that significantly more torque will shift the engine when the wheels are on the ground, but hopefully it is not an issue.

The last update ended at the muffler. The stainless Borla muffler came off a junkyard truck. The Borla was picked since it wasn’t rusty and is from a quality manufacturer. It also included two long sections of stainless 3” piping with mandrel bends coming off of it that I can cut and repurpose. Although the junkyard pics make it look dirty, there is potential. These pics make me look a bit redneck, but it’s an effective JY outfit, thanks to Jeremy for the pics:
Image
Image
Image

All of the junkyard piping needed to be cleaned up and re-welded in a different configuration for the Jetta, but it was cheap at just $30 for about 12 feet of stainless mandrel bent pipes and a name-brand muffler. The plan for this GRM Jetta is to use 2.5”-3” exhaust piping - way overkill for the ABA motor, but leaves room to expand to a turbo down the road. The muffler has a 2.5” inlet and dual 2” outlets, although the plan is to run a single pipe, not duals. The next thing to figure out was how to bring the dual muffler outlets back together to a single pipe. Two 2” bends were cut and welded to a 2.5” pipe, creating a merge pipe:
Image

From the merge pipe a 2.5” pipe runs back to a cone shaped transition to 3” pipe for the 3” stainless that forms the side exit.
Image

Side exit exhaust is desired to cut out as much weight as possible by keeping the system short. The driver’s side exit was chosen since the passenger side is already occupied with the fuel pump and fuel lines – an area the hot exhaust pipes should avoid.
Passenger side no go:
Image

Although there are still some minor space conflicts on the driver’s side with an emergency brake line and the proportioning valve for the rear brakes – these can both be resolved simply. The brake lines were bent up a little bit to be out of the way and the emergency brake cable was rerouted OVER the rear beam axle.
Here is what the space started out as:
Image
I had read VWGuyBruce’s account of the fire he suffered in his GRM Jetta a few years ago. My understanding is that he had removed the factory heat shielding and his hot exhaust/muffler started a fire of the undercoating in the same area where my exhaust will be exiting. To prevent the same from occurring I’m retaining a cut down OEM heat shield and scraping off the undercoating and respraying with some high heat reflective paint:
Scraped/ground off undercoating:
Image
Primed the bare metal and covered the area with high heat paint:
Image
In the pic above you can also see where I had ground off some studs in the floorpan that were no longer needed, these are the areas that are sprayed with some maroon spray paint left over from a Jeep project almost 20 years ago. The same paint was used when I drilled out the broken studs holding the cross brace across the tunnel and tapped the holes. Trying to prevent any bare metal showing and eventually rusting:
Image

A turn down style tip was chosen to keep the exhaust from hanging below the body. Some cars are notched to allow side-exit exhaust, which can look great, but it seems like a unibody car without a rollcage would give up a lot of body rigidity with this area of the unibody cut. Here is what the side pipe started out as:
Image
And cut down to:
Image
Image

Here is the entire exhaust (minus header) being finish welded off the car:
Image

Here is an idea of how it was hanging under the car:
Image

The last step of running the new exhaust was incorporating hangers into the pipes to support the weight of the system and take stress off the header. The hanger at the rear of the tunnel was used but didn’t prevent the side pipe from exerting a twisting force at the header. Another hanger was installed with some studs made from chopped up bolts and welded near the rear brake junction/modulator. These studs served as a location to hang an OEM exhaust hangers and secure the cut down OEM heat shield.
You can see the cut down heat shield:
Image
Held up by the new studs/exhaust hanger:
Image
And the original exhaust hanger at the end of the tunnel:
Image
A shot from under the spare tire well showing both hangers:
Image

Throughout this exhaust build each piece was on and off the car countless times. Now that everything fit I took it all off again since I had to pull the header to add an O2 bung and paint it with some high temp paint. I didn’t get any shots of the O2 bung, but part of the reason the progress is so slow is because things like recycled O2 bungs are a big time sink. From a budgetary stand point it made more sense to cut a used bung out of the old cat rather than buying a perfect new one for $4 or whatever. Here’s how the finished painted header turned out installed:
Image
Image
The finished exhaust just barely peeks out from under the side of the car:
Image
Image

The other thing that was done was to repair the broken Tenzo (JDM yo!) seat that I had picked up last year. I was originally planning on installing these in the car after they were fixed, but decided to stick with the original seats for now. I’m planning on selling these. When I got the seat the frame was cracked. That also ripped the bolster. The base was butt welded back together and then some angle iron was used to make some reinforcing patches over the butt welds, the whole thing was painted with that same old maroon spray paint:
Image
Image
Image
The bolster was fixed by gluing it together:
Image
And the whole thing reassembled remarkably easy. Stuck up in the attic for now until I get a chance to make a craigslist posting.

Minor odds and ends on the car which I don’t think I have posted yet:
Studs installed at all four wheels:
Image
There was some epoxy glue holding on the missing door molding that was scraped off, some scrapes went down to bare metal that was primed on the door:
Image
Blacked out sidemarkers glued in:
Image

So that brings us back to the beginning of the post. The car was taken off jack stands, the battery reconnected, and she fired right up. It is a loud, vibrating beast with the hockey puck motor mounts, exhaust, and no insulation. The engine was responsive, but the clutch still has what seems like an unusually long throw. Hopefully I wasn’t just throwing away money with the new clutch…  There will be some more time spent dialing that in. Suspension will be next.


Fri Feb 10, 2012 4:50 pm
Profile
CVO Forums User
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:42 am
Posts: 50
Minor updates only. The last post announced that everything coming off the car is for sale. The challenge rules state that you can recoup money in your budget by selling things off the car. I’ve been working at taking pictures of all this stuff and posting it on craigslist, vwvortex, chicagovw.org, and on the GRM $2012 classifieds. Contact me if you need anything! I may resort to ebay for some stuff.

Some of the stuff that was listed for sale hasn’t actually come off the car yet, but will. As a result I found a buyer for the right rear window regulator, which was promptly removed and shipped out. The only problem was that now the window didn’t have anything to hold it up in the frame. I needed to figure out a way to clamp it in a fixed up position. At the same time it didn’t make much sense to reinstall the door card, so I decided to go “full-race” and gut the door shell while making a bracket to hold up the window. This was a really satisfying process.
I cut out this piece:
Image

To leave the door looking like this:
Image

I then cut out a chunk of the metal removed from the door and drilled some holes in it to make a bracket to bolt to the rubber grommeted window holder things. This is the hardware I found in the garage:
Image

Looking up inside the door, this is how it bolts up:
Image

Had to remove the sound deadening pad and add some speed holes:
Image

I only did the one door so far, I’m waiting for someone to buy the left rear window regulator to give an excuse to do the other side! If anyone has any lexan/polycarbonate lying around they want to get rid of let me know, I’d rather get rid of the glass altogether, but can’t justify the expense of new sheets.

Since that was so satisfying, skinning the trunk lid seemed like a good idea. Starting out with a paint pen to trace out where to cut:
Image

Cuts made and a heat gun and scraper employed to get rid of the glue holding the ribs to the trunk lid left this on the floor:
Image

And the result:
Image

In reality the weight savings is not huge from either of these things, but every little bit adds up. Plus they sure are fun projects to do!

I have also been building up a little bit of inventory of parts to go on the car. We may be moving in the next couple of months, so I’m trying not to start on any project that will have the car immovable, but made some progress on suspension by picking up some coil springs from the front of a Ford work van (E250 I think) that will be cut down to work as front springs. The calculated cut-down rate on them is close to 600 lbs/ft! If these work I will likely ditch the front sway bar to save more weight.
Image
I need to find something cheap for the rear but also have a line on a takeoff aftermarket suspension from a VR6 Golf, unfortunately I don’t know what the spring rates or shocks are, but hope to find out more in the next couple of weeks.

Also thanks to Mobile One for letting me know they were clearing out some used inventory. I picked up this TDi VNT turbo with integrated manifold. The wastegate controller is bad, but ultimately this will be an easier low boost solution than using the DSM turbo that I posted earlier. I’m thinking I will just set the variable vanes to a mid-point to limit boost and run without a wastegate. This may be a later phase of the build, but I’m keeping a lookout for a cheap rising rate fuel pressure regulator (FMU) and recirculation/blow-off valve. I picked up some VR6 injectors and Volvo and Saab plumbing at the junkyard. Will probably go for a cheapy ebay oil feed and return lines. Will also need a wideband…
Image


Tue Apr 17, 2012 3:22 pm
Profile
CVO Motorsports Director
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 30, 2007 6:08 pm
Posts: 851
Location: Vorsprung...
ooo its nice to see progress!

_________________
--Jake--
2005 Audi S4
MK3 VR...attempt at a show car?


Tue Apr 17, 2012 3:53 pm
Profile
CVO Forums User
User avatar

Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2012 12:15 pm
Posts: 12
i gotta say, its a magnificent looking car, keep up the good work!!!

_________________
Warning! Objects in mirror are losing!


Tue Apr 17, 2012 10:34 pm
Profile
CVO Forums User
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:42 am
Posts: 50
Mk3 Jetta GRM Build – started writing May 2012…..thread picked up July 2014
This stalled project has been restarted at a slow pace. Since the last real update in April 2012 I moved, started a new job, and the kids are getting bigger (more active & busy). All of these things take most of my free time. In the little free time left, I have managed to get the Jetta back in the garage for some overdue updates. I originally wrote most of this update in May of 2012, so I’ll pick up there:

Updates have been fueled by ongoing sales, thanks to samiam’s need for the vacuum lines and diaphragms inside the doors, the front two doors have been partially gutted. I have been able to recoup some budget by selling items off the car including: both rear window regulators, the secondary air injection pump, the vacuum lines and diaphragms from 3 of the 4 doors, one door harness, the ashtray, one door lock pin, a plastic insert from the front bumper, the center console, all plastic interior trim except dashboard, all carpeting, and the air conditioning system (less compressor). I’m surprised by some of the things that people need and also surprised that some stuff hasn’t had much interest.

I also sold a few things that don’t impact the car budget since they didn’t come with the car, but represent work done: Tenzo seats, 13x10 Bassett race wheels with slicks, Mk4 dipstick tube. I made a little spending money on each of these, but since I can’t add it to the budget I’ll bring the wife out to dinner for putting up with me.

Although I sold most of what was in the doors, I retained the luxuries of power windows and power side mirrors in the front doors for street driven convenience. Everything else was taken out. On the passenger side front door I removed the door bars, the metal one in the middle is fairly heavy (5-10 lbs) and the aluminum one at the base of the door is probably another 3-4 lbs. I left these in the driver door for some level of street safety, but they can be pulled in about 10 minutes for competition.
Long front door bar and shorter front door bars shown, one in each door. Front doors also have an aluminum bar:
Image

Both rear doors have now been completely gutted. I gutted the remains of the door the same way I did the driver’s side rear last month (April 2012), although I didn’t go through the time intensive step of drilling the holes. Eventually I’d like to rivet/bolt in lexan rear windows and cut away a little more of the door structure, so I’m not going to sweat about what is remaining on the door frame.

While cleaning out all the doors I’m seeing evidence that this car had been broken into several times, lots of broken glass in a couple of the doors. Did I mention that the previous owner bought this car in L.A.?

Lots of glass in the shop vac:
Image

I’m still trying to figure out suspension. I worked with the junkyard Ford van springs a little bit to mock up fitment. I cut off a few coils from the van spring to make it about the right ride height for the Jetta and bolted it together. It fits remarkably well!

Ford van coil spring before and after trimming:
Image

Cut Ford spring next to wimpy OEM Jetta spring:
Image

Ford van cut coil spring test fitted on Bilstein:
Image

Initially I was shooting for around 500 lbs/in in the rear and 400 lbs/in for the front. I have been using a spring rate calculator at this link http://www.racingsuspensionproducts.com ... 20rate.htm
to figure out the approximate spring rate I will end up after the coils are cut. After cutting these van springs to the right height, I figured that the spring rate is now up to 857 lbs/in! This looks like way too much spring, these will blow out the Bilstein sport struts! Let’s look at other options….

Challenge competitors have used ebay coilovers with success in the past. For those of you who aren’t familiar with these, they are a threaded coilover sleeve with collars for a spring to rest on. The whole sleeve slips over a stock strut and either rests on the stock spring perch, or a weld-on tab. Those E250 springs from the junkyard are cheap at $15 each but take a ton of time to fabricate to work.

I looked on ebay and found a set of coilover sleeves with springs for $45 shipped, which actually works out to be cheaper than the junkyard springs @ $45/4= $11.25 per corner for each spring and coilover sleeve. Since this appeared to be a cheaper, more adjustable option, I went ahead and ordered a set that said they were specific to the Mk3 Jetta/Golf. They came in a few days and appeared to be decent quality. I used the same calculator above to calculate the spring rates and came up with 593 lbs/in, perfect!
Image
Image

I already bought a set of used Bilstein Sport shocks so I test fit the coilover sleeves. The rear test fitted well:
Image

Unfortunately the front’s didn’t work with the Bilstein Sport strut body. The coilover sleeve has a 2” I.D. (internal diameter) while the front Bilstein struts have a 2.17” O.D (outer diameter), meaning the sleeve doesn’t fit over the front strut. Arrgh. In fairness to the coilover sleeves, they DO fit over the OEM strut, but I don’t know why you would want to use the underdamped stock struts with a much higher spring rate that would blow out the shock. Maybe Bilstein’s competitors use a thinner strut body?
Back to the drawing board on suspension. I can make the rears work, but I have ruled out the van springs in the front as too stiff and the “perfect” coilover springs in the front won’t fit without a lot of hassle. Frustrating.


Thu Aug 21, 2014 10:24 pm
Profile
CVO Forums User
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2010 6:42 am
Posts: 50
I alluded to the long period between updates in the last post, but didn’t say much since I was working off an update that was written two years ago and never posted. The plan is to make updates as I have them until the project is “finished”. I’m not sure what “finished” means since the original goal was to build for and compete in the Grassroots Motorsports Challenge https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/event ... challenge/, and that has not happened, nor will it is happen in 2014 since I’m out of vacation time. I would still like to do it, but taking a few days of vacation to spend hundreds of dollars on gas, a trailer, lodging, and entry fees to compete in Florida is not the top priority.

In the meantime I’ll continue to build to the Challenge rules, but with a new mindset, if I have to spend a little bit to get get it done quicker I will. I just don’t have time to spend 10 hours to fabricate something I can buy for $100 (or similar logic). Going forward I want to get this thing to an autocross and road course foremost so that I can use it as a low buck competition car that I won’t cry about if it gets destroyed. I’ll continue to track the budget and keep it under $2000.

After two years of intermittent use as my “urban pickup truck”, I pulled the Jetta in to the garage for suspension, my minimum requirement before competing.
I didn’t take pics until I was partway along, but here is where it sits as the project came in for the next phase of work:
Image

Engine bay a little dirtier, but still the same:
Image

I was looking at pictures of when the headers were freshly cleaned up and cried about how they look now:
Image
Interior of a Jetta GL devoid of any extras plus some dirty feet:
Image

…and a shot of the trunk/rear seat area with cardboard duct taped in place for all the Home Depot runs. (True story – several eight foot Christmas trees , 500 pounds of chain link fence/posts, and lots of 8’-12’ long lumber has all fit in the back of this):
Image


Since every project needs a plan, I jotted down the main things to get done before the first autocross:
Image
For those that can’t read my handwriting – and to explain:
• Delete FSB (front sway bar) – to go along with increased spring rates, see below
• Engine mount – will be detailed below, needs to be softened
• Washer sprayer – one of the two windshield washer sprayers broke such that it dumps a huge flow of water out low on the windshield, the little insert with the two pin-size holes came out somewhere along the line. Low priority, more a nuisance.
• Side trim – cosmetic belt line rubber trim pieces that didn’t all come with the car. Junkyard purchases need to be cleaned up, painted, and glued on.
• Lexan windows – might not happen short term, but I do have some cheap Lexan to use for the rear windows
• Resonator/exhaust – the exhaust is way too loud. I have an extra resonator left over from an STi that I plan to add in to tone it down slightly
• Shocks
• Springs
• Bushings – suspension bushings to be replaced by polyurethane kit purchased a few years ago
• Brake lines & flush – the lines are a low priority, but I already bought them 2-3 years ago as routine maintenance, the flush needs to happen either way
• Resurface rotors – front brake rotors have a lot of rust that won’t come off and makes the car sound like ish when rolling through the neighborhood – squeak squeak squeak squeak
• Pads – brake pads, crossed off when I looked at them, lots of life left and they still lock up the tires just fine. These are no-namers that came on the car, but until I have a problem, who cares…

First thing to do on the list is the front suspension, front brakes, and rear engine mount.

I wanted to change out the bushings in the lower control arms first. I had bought a Prothane Polyurethane kit a couple of years ago to replace all the bushings. Since then I’ve read these may not be the best choice, but what the hell, I’ve got ‘em and they are surely better than the worn out stockers.

I removed the wheels, pulled the struts, and went to remove the spindles from the control arms. Most of the bolts have been in surprisingly good shape, probably because of the California ownership, but I ran into some trouble with one of the three captive nuts on the fastener that helps sandwich a plate on the ball joint at the bottom of the spindle between the top and bottom of the lower control arm (if this doesn’t make sense look at two pictures below).

You can see the left rear captive nut broke free and was mangled with vice grips to get the nut out. This was after using PB Blaster (penetrating fluid) and heat from a torch. I’ll have to fix this before re-assembly.
Image

The last thing to go was the sway bar connection. You can also see the three holes at the bottom of the lower control arm where that fastener with the mangled nut goes, the spindle slides between the two pieces of metal of the LCA and is sandwiched with the bolts on the bottom and the plate with the captive nuts on the top:
Image

Once everything was disconnected from the LCAs the entire axle with the spindle and brakes was suspended from the shock towers with a ratchet strap and pulled up out of the way. Looking up from the ground you can see the ratchet strap holding everything up and out of the way (the bungee cord was my first attempt, it wasn’t strong enough):
Image

With everything out of the way, the control arms were removed to get to the bushings.

Inspection of the rear LCA bushing shows severe wear, with splits emanating out from the relief holes; look between 3 o’clock and 6 o’clock and a little bit at 10 and 12 o’clock on this pic:
Image

Pushing out the original bushings after 250k+ miles:
Image
Image

Comparing OEM to Prothane LCA bushings:
Image

Pressing in the Prothane bushings:
Image

All cleaned up and ready to go:
Image

Rinse and repeat for the other side.

Now that both front LCAs were off the car and the associated parts were disassembled, I decided now was the time to remove the front sway bar. The plan from the beginning was to delete the front sway bar and make up for it with high spring rates. I figure I’ll save some weight this way and hope that the independent front suspension can better do its job when I’m pushing the car to the limits.
I didn’t realize I would have to pull the whole front subframe to remove the front sway bar. After figuring that out, I pulled the subframe and removed the front sway bar:
Image

With the front subframe pulled and the engine mounts within easy reach, it was time to tackle another part of the to-do list.
After putting a couple of longish drives on the car, I decided I need to compromise and soften the car a little bit. The car vibrates so much through the motor mounts that my hands tingle after 30 minutes on the highway. You also can’t see anything in the rearview mirror with the severe vibration coming through the car. Engineers refer to this as NVH (noise, vibration, harshness) and measure on a scale. In my case, “yes to all three!!!”

To alleviate some of the vibration, I need to add a little softness back to the motor mounts. The plan is to section a piece of the stock squishy motor mount and make a hybrid motor mount. I’ll take out one of the hockey pucks in my modified rear motor mount and replace it with a section of OEM rubber. The rear motor mount supposedly transmits the most vibration to the inside of the car, I’m going to leave the solid hockey puck front mount and the heavy duty VR6 trans mount alone.
I replaced two of the hockey pucks in the rear motor mount with the squishy rubber, first I held them up to each other and made a mark, adding a little material to the OEM mount knowing it will compress more:
Image

Then sectioned:
Image

Reinstalled:
Image

And of course it is completely invisible when installed:
Image

Now with the front sway bar removed and the rear motor mount modified (again), the front subframe was reinstalled:
Image

The LCAs were next to be installed. I used all of the sticky grease supplied by Prothane and started banging away trying to get the rear bushing to slide into place first. For those of you trying this for the first time, skip the hammer and grab a pry bar. This pic shows the best position I found to pry the rear bushing into place (it has to slide in from the front towards the rear). This pic also shows some slight deformity where the brass hammer banged the leading edge of the LCA about two inches outboard of where the pry bar is:
Image

Once the rear bushing is in put the bolt loosely in place to hold it and the front bushing pushes in by hand, right side shown here:
Image

Reassembly of the spindles to the LCAs is next. The first thing I had to do was to fix the captive nut that got mangled mentioned above. I spot welded all the captive nuts in place first:
Image

Then added a coat of paint (left over metallic maroon from a CJ-5 project almost 20 years ago) and cleaned up the threads of the nuts and bolts with tap and die so I don’t have any issues next time I take this apart:
Image

One of the bolts was pretty corroded, probably the one that ripped the captive nut out. I’m still using it:
Image

Back together, already dirty, but the best looking bracket no one will ever see:
Image

Next time, on to the suspension and brakes.


Sun Aug 24, 2014 10:05 pm
Profile
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 56 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Designed by ST Software for PTF.
Americanized by Maël Soucaze.